: ZKM :: Artikel :: Events 02|2005 MKN Lectures 2 | Abstracts
 
 

  

ZKM_Events :: February 2005

Symposium: Media Art Net Lectures 2
Thematic Fields and Discursive Connections

Friday, 25 February 2005 , 2-8 pm
ZKM_Media Theatre, day ticket 6/4

[-> Abstracts auf Deutsch]

Abstracts:

Survey of Media Art
»Survey of Media Art« was the first module published for »Media Art Net« in January 2004. This module serves as a foundation for all other »Key Topics«, and reacts at the same time to an additional paradox of mediation in the media: up until now, even those relevant Web sites that deal with media art still lacked a comprehensive introduction to this subject. The exemplary selection of materials and source texts as well the semantic links made by both authors as well as the database is thus an important prerequisite for developing approaches to a curriculum on media art. In terms of subject matter, ten introductory essays dedicated both to historical developments as well as interlinking references in terms of content are collected to a »survey.«
Rudolf Frieling (ZKM Center for Art and Media, Karlsruhe), Dieter Daniels (HGB Academy of Visual Arts, Leipzig)

^

Aesthetics of the Digital
Digital technologies and telecommunication media produce radical changes in the areas of art, perception and aesthetics that give rise to new interdisciplinary theories. This thematic field demonstrates the resulting paradigmatic discourses and tendencies, and these enable us to understand new aesthetic theories as well as the symbiosis of scientific, artistic, systemic, and media thought. Of special value on the one side is the historic overview of preliminary theories confronting the interrelation of aesthetics and information, and on the other side the aesthetic theories of interactive media art that emphasize the creative dialogue of the recipient with the open structure of the work.
Claudia Giannetti (MECAD, Media Centre of Art and Design of the Superior School of Design ESDi, Barcelona)

^

Sound and Image
An important realization that permeates the collected Avant-garde movements of the twentieth century is the close relationship between innovations on technical procedures and new forms of artistic expressions and contents, and that of the interference of genres to a synaesthetic art, especially in the early 1910s as well as in the 1920s. After witnessing the developments of Futurism and Dada, sound poems, new typographies, and devices for creating color music, what proves to be a decisively new step in the 1950s and 1960s is that, with electronics, these medial approaches find their adequate means of expression for the first time. Engaged in since the 1990s under similar circumstances is the re-adoption of approaches from the 1960s. Today's digital technology makes commonplace many of the processes produced by artists thirty years ago with a great effort. John Cage's spliced segments of recording tape can now be compared with current sampler techniques. This complex of themes poses two questions in particular: In which forms and contexts are intermedia practices artistically and technologically most successful? Does only the permanent ambivalence of »high & low« enable an unpunished interplay between the genres?
Dieter Daniels/Inke Arns (HGB Academy of Visual Arts, Leipzig)

^

Cyborg Bodies
This topic takes the phantasies, constellations, and representations of techno-organic, hybrid and synthetic bodies and their metaphorics in a broad sense as its starting point. It is clear, for example, that in the past few years the notion of the machine body has been supplanted by notions of networked, emergent, dynamic and biotic body identities and communicating information streams. This means that the cyborg is not only implicated in the interface between organism and machine but more generally in the fantasies of hybrid, monstrous, synthetic machine-like, cloned, digital, networked, and cellular bodies as well as the networked discursive meanings in Donna Haraway's sense. The essays take the artistic reflections and realizations of cyborgs as a starting point to study the specific contribution offered by art to these discourses on »future bodies« and subjects.
Yvonne Volkart (HGKZ - Institut Cultural Studies in Art, Media and Design of the Academy for Art and Design, Zurich).

^

Generative Tools
»Generative tools« and »software art« are terms which occasionally overlap. At the same time they designate, each in their own way, the thematic emphasis. Crucial questions pursued in the scientific contributions are: Does software call for a cultural understanding of its own? Can an artwork be composed 'only' as/from software? What prerequisites allow software to be understood as art and not as an aid for producing a digital artwork? Is »software art« a trade and/or artistic direction? Is the fact that software consists of code enough to declare it an artwork? In which historic context should the aforementioned questions be placed? The theme is investigated by way of three fields of interest: »generative design,« »software art,« and »generative games.«
Tjark Ihmels/Julia Riedel (Institute for Media Design, University of Applied Sciences, Mainz)

^

Art and Cinematography
When speaking of »new media« and »media art,« film is ostracized as being the »old« new medium, with special emphasis given to current technological developments and their aesthetic reflection. Nevertheless, it remains evident that the historic perspective needed for understanding the new media and media art can only be achieved by keeping the history of cinematography in mind. Doing this involves understanding the complex relationships made accessible through the artistic approach to cinematography, as well as understanding the essential, institutional and socioeconomic conditions under which its use could be developed. In this way the history of cinematography is not understood as merely the prehistory of new media and media art; it also reveals an historic orientation regarding how the new media is handled. »Art and Cinematography« encourages a theoretical and historical confrontation with these developments.
Gregor Stemmrich (Academy of Fine Arts Dresden, in collaboration with the educational initiative »Bildungsportal Sachsen«)

^

Mapping and Text
This project investigates different areas and fields of interest that historically and currently have emerged between image and text. It focuses on artistic strategies for visualizing spaces determined by texts as much as it does on a semantic navigation through image spaces. The themes are specifically concerned with the meta-discourse of the archive including database and search engines, and with a focus on dynamic representations. With the artistic exploration of different media and their inherent qualities meanwhile achieved, the principal concern here is to construct a process-related cartography using the thematic connecting thread of image-and-text.
Rudolf Frieling (ZKM Center for Art and Media, Karlsruhe)

^

Public Sphere_s
In these telematic times, it is not just the digital commons that is at stake. From personal privacy to increasing privatization of societal goods; from gated communities to the town square on CCTV; from a limited right of copyright to a limited notion of the commonweal; from homogenization to globalization, the public sphere-along with our ability to imagine it-is withering. Many artists and cultural workers are actively challenging the global drift toward privatization and dimunition of the public sphere and critically addressing current regimes and modeling new possibilities. »Public Sphere_s« is both a platform to support some of these projects, and a site for critical, participatory, public discourse about them and the issues they raise.
Steve Dietz (ISEA San Jose/Minneapolis and ZKM Center for Art and Media, Karlsruhe)

^

© 2017 ZKM | Zentrum für Kunst und Medientechnologie Karlsruhe :: Impressum/Web Site Credits